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My Top 5 Moments from Copenhagen’s MAD Symposium

The MAD Symposium (“mad” means food in Danish) attracts top chefs from around the globe, all looking to move the world of food forward. Landing a spot takes effort and isn’t cheap, yet if you can manage to score a ticket, the takeaways are huge. The best way for students to get involved is to sign up as an intern. So save your money and get to Denmark — you might just change the world.

Saving our Seas: Can Seafood Truly Be Sustainable?

Is truly sustainable seafood possible? How can we maintain the ocean’s ecological balance while still enjoying its bounty? What role can technology play in increasing the safety and traceability of our seafood supply?

These questions and more were debated by chefs, restaurateurs, researchers and entrepreneurs at the Jacques Pépin Foundation’s inaugural Seafood Symposium, which was hosted at JWU Providence’s College of Culinary Arts with the support of the Chefs Collaborative and Save the Bay.

JWU Culinology Team Develops OURgrain: Sustainable Spent-Grain Snacks

Last March, JWU’s student culinology team won first prize at the Research Chefs Association’s inaugural Evolution of Food Waste Student competition, held at the RCA’s annual conference in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Harvesting Hope: Gracie’s Chef Matt Varga on Growing RI’s Food Systems

This year’s Harvesting Hope fundraiser to benefit the Southside Community Land Trust (SCLT) will feature a menu designed by Gracie’s executive chef Matt Varga '05 that will draw almost exclusively from local farmers, purveyors and brewers. The event, which takes place at the Squantum Association on Tuesday, October 3, highlights the SCLT’s work to strengthen, expand and better integrate a sustainable local food system here in Rhode Island.

Zero Waste, Maximum Flavor: Chef Mike Thibault '09 Returns to JWU

“The minute you stop learning as a chef is the minute you become obsolete,” Chef Mike Thibault '09 recently explained to a capacity crowd at JWU Providence’s College of Culinary Arts. The university’s 178th Distinguished Visiting Chef (DVC) was explaining how the process of becoming a leader is ever-evolving: “It’s the faith people put in you. You don’t have to have all the answers — and if you make mistakes, own up to them.”