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Why I Love Working at Culinary Events like Roots Cultivate 2018

Natasha Daniels '17 has pursued her culinary curiosity from a young age. In her native Ohio, she worked in restaurant kitchens and volunteered locally at places like the Culinary Vegetable Institute (CVI) to expand and strengthen her skills. At JWU, she was part of the student culinology team that won first prize at the Research Chefs Association’s inaugural Evolution of Food Waste Student competition. Now that team is developing a full line of products, OURGrain, using Brewer’s spent grain (BSG). Daniels also works as a private chef and keeps up her Ohio connections by assisting at CVI events like Roots Cultivate, where she catches up with chefs from all over the US — including JWU alumni. Read all about her experience at the 2018 conference:

An Emotional Return for Chef Chris Cosentino '94

They say you can’t go home again, but try telling that to Chef Chris Cosentino '94, whose whirlwind return to JWU Providence after 18 years included visits to his former South Hall room, his old kitchen-classrooms (now completely redone), and even Delaney Gym, where JWU used to hold Distinguished Visiting Chef (DVC) presentations.

Baking with the World’s Best: JWU Team Competes in Munich

A team of JWU Charlotte baking & pastry students and instructors recently traveled to Munich to compete in the IBA Cup, one of the world’s most prestigious baking competitions.

Taking place every 3 years at IBA, a leading baking, confectionery and snack trade fair, the championship challenges bakers from 12 countries to create exquisite breads, small pastries and showpieces.

Pressure, Excitement and Focus: My Culinary Day in the Life

Four-thirty in the morning. That’s when my eyes flutter open and my ears hear the piercing alarm going off. Although it’s early, I can’t help but feel excited for what the day is about to bring! Every day, from Monday to Thursday, I start my day at 4:30am and get ready for a productive day in my sophomore labs.

Out of the Hospital + Into the Kitchen: Culinary Student Defies the Odds

For the first 16 years of his life, Chris Bledsoe was attached to a battery-operated pump that fed him nutrients intravenously to keep him alive. When he tried to eat solid foods, acid reflux would kick in. Chris has been living with mitochondrial disease, a rare genetic disorder where the process for extracting energy from foods is disrupted (among other symptoms). From birth, doctors told his parents that his longterm prognosis was poor. But Chris proved everyone wrong.